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Black History Month Artists Explain PMU On Melanin Skin

Black History Month Artists Explain PMU On Melanin Skin

Black History Month Artists Explain PMU On Melanin Skin

Microbeau strives to provide quality information and education to our fellow artist community. A major question that comes up for many artist is how to perform certain PMU procedures on melanin skin, and what is the difference between such skin types and caucasian/other skin types. Our Black History month artists have taken the time to answer some of these essential questions and give some advice for artists who are only beginning to work on melanin skin. 

Read along

Zuri Dale, Founder of PMU CON, Epidemiologist, & PMU Expert

Zuri Dale

Can you give us some tips for performing PMU on melanin skin?

Sebaceous glands are both larger and exist in greater quantity than non-black skin. As a result, black skin tends to produce more oil than lighter skin complexions. Black skin has more collagen fibers that are denser and more numerous which leads to a thicker dermal layer. This does give anti-aging benefits in black skin but directly impacts our services. The impact of implanting too deeply is greater in Black skin versus caucasian skin due to dermal tissue growth on top of the implanted work. Black skin also has a tendency to scar more due to the overproduction of collagen. In fact, Black skin is anywhere from 15-25% more likely to scar wherever skin is damaged. 

How does this differ from PMU on caucasian/ other races?

The pH of black skin tends to be lower and more acidic than caucasian skin which is a critical key factor when choosing pigments because pigments should be formulated at a more neutral pH. If they aren't, the pH of the outlying skin can cause fluctuations in pigment pH, thereby causing color changes that we may not expect. Outside of the physical, biological, and chemical differences we must give attention to social implications and health disparities that exist in Black populations that don't in caucasian reference groups.  Black people are more prone to chronic health conditions and other underlying health conditions that they may or may not be aware of which either directly impact or are indirectly impacted by our services. A great example of this is that diabetics are 25% more likely to suffer complications from wound healing, and diabetes is a health disparity and chronic condition that disproportionately impacts Blacks.  

What is some advice you would give a beginner trying to learn how to work on different skin types?

If you are interested in learning to work on different skin types it is crucial that you begin at a cellular level. While not often considered or treated as such, the skin is an organ. Organs themselves are aggregates of tissue, and cells are combined to form tissues. As such, you cannot learn the intricacies of skin without hyper-focusing on the scientific principles of the cell, which is the fundamental unit of biological life. Working on different skin types is beyond selecting color. The focus is more-so on how the products we use metabolize once in the body, which differs among ethnicities, and how we can take advantage of cellular activity to improve and promote stable healed results. 

Monica McLaurin

 Monica McLaurin

Can you give us some tips for performing PMU on melanin skin? 

Working on melanin skin can often be intimidating but it has been by far the easiest thing I’ve ever mastered. One big tip I can give is not to always choose the darkest pigments. My absolute favorite combo is Evenflo Terra which I pair with a couple drops of Perma Blend's Blackish Brown which adds depth to ensure retention. Adding a drop of Evenflo Neutralizer also helps to ensure the brows heal warm. This color combo is a for sure win. Just adjust the ratio depending upon the skin tone and you will have beautiful healed results every time. 

How does this differ from PMU on caucasian/other races? 

Working on melanin skin requires color theory skills to ensure the procedure doesn’t heal cool or grayish in the long run. Color theory is very important in other races as well as there is no "one size fits all" formula for every skin tone. Overtones and Undertones play an important part. I apply these same principles when working on clients of other races as well. Don’t be afraid to mix and swatch to find the right pigment tone for your client.

What is some advice you would give a beginner trying to learn how to work on different skin types?

Some vital advice I can give for beginners learning to work on different skin tones is to not always try to pair the pigment choice solely with the clients hair color alone. Assessing their skin tone is a very important factor as well. Don’t be afraid to reach out to seasoned artist with questions, we’re all in this together! 

Jenny Lind

Jenny Lind

Can you give us some tips for performing PMU on melanin skin?

Most artists would think that when you service a client that has deep melanin-rich skin that the first thing to do would be go deeper in depth and darker with color. But these 2 things are exactly what you do not want to do. You should work lighter on the skin and layer pigment in. Working too invasively on melanin skin can cause inflammation, and when that happen, the skin rejects the pigment. And as far as color choice, we want to choose a color at least 2 times darker in hue than the actual clients skin, but remember to keep the color warm in tone.

How does this differ from PMU on caucasian/other races?

Working on melanin skin is different because this skin tends to be more sensitive to inflammation. Finding the right color choice is not hard so long as the density in the pigment is there.

What is some advice you would give a beginner trying to learn how to work on different skin types?

Be open minded about your approach. There are many ways to get quality results. Learn from different educators that have experience on working on these types of clients and learn to use different tools.

Ashli Briggs

Ashli Briggs 

Can you give us some tips for performing PMU on melanin skin? 

Myth Buster! Working on melanin skin isn’t as difficult, scary, or different from working on any other skin type. There are 3 main questions I ask myself when I assess all of my clients, including my melanin-rich clients:

  1. What skin texture am I working on?
  2. What skin type am I woking on?
  3. What color formula will match best?

 

When you understand the skin you’re working on, and what tools and techniques to choose from your tool box of knowledge, you’re much more confident in your abilities and you’re able to confidently work on ALL skin types.

How does this differ from PMU on caucasian/other races?

Myth Buster! There is no difference in working on melanin-rich skin versus any other Fitzpatrick skin type. Skin is skin. Understanding the needs of the skin you’re working on and being educated on how to approach different skin needs, is what makes you confident in being able to work on other clients. A Fitz 2 and a Fitz 5 who both have large pores, thick, and oily skin are both similar in texture. Therefore, the technique approaches for both will be very similar. The only difference would be the pigment formula that I choose for each.

What is some advice you would give a beginner trying to learn how to work on different skin types?

Get educated by someone who shows a diverse pool of clientele. An educator who has worked continuously on different skin types/shades, is far better equipped to give you helpful technique tips and tricks to understanding different skin types. Remember, the more clients you’re able to help, the more profitable your business will be.

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